Obsession Vs. Improvement: A comparison between the healthy and unhealthy motivations for Plastic Surgery

Board Certified Plastic Surgeon Serving Areas Near Houston & Sugar Land, TX

Mar 24, 2008

Genuine desire for improvement is a fundamental human trait. However a need or obsession to be “perfect”, or a change to emulate an unrealistic image can be unhealthy and lead to further self-image problems later on. Regardless of the outcome, a procedure that is undergone for the wrong reasons can do more harm than good.

Fine lines separate certain aspects of reality and fantasy, and a clear distinction of motivation and expectation is important before you consider getting plastic surgery. These are important for many  reasons. Dr. Michael Eisemann of Cosmetic Surgery Center in Houston carefully guides his patients through the consultation period in his Houston based practice, for their psychological health as much as their physical.

Pursuits of perfection are problematic. They lead to unrealistic desires such as having no wrinkles or desiring a body that is unhealthy or unachievable.
When thinking about what you want it's important to make sure not to base desired outcomes on unrealistic images portrayed in advertisements or through the eyes of Hollywood glamor. Thanks to airbrushing and editing the final product is often very different than the real deal. Even with the most beautiful celebrities their real isn't good enough, like in "Fight Club" when a six-pack double was used because Brad Pitt wasn't deemed buff enough.

Even though he ranks highly on several lists of the world's most beautiful men. Pitt once said, "I'm one of those people you hate because of genetics." which is quite a statement from one of Hollywood's brightest stars. To make matter worse, the full-time staff including, personal trainer, diet expert, make-up artists, and others go to great lengths to create and maintain these celebrity images, increasing the gap between reality what we are shown as being "beautiful."

The moral of the story is that beauty, while being undeniably physical, is arguably equally connected to  what is inside and how you portray that to others through emotions and personality. A simple test of this principle is to take a picture of yourself with a bland or neutral look and one with a genuine smile. Then compare the difference in response the two get from others. It all comes down to balance. That is the key, and if you've made up your mind to have a procedure, or already had one, make sure you don't forget to supplement that with a genuine smile!